Die Legende vom toten Soldaten (Kurt Weill)

A live performance during a recital of the Robert Schumann Conservatory in Düsseldorf.

“Die Legende vom toten Soldaten” (1929)
Music: Kurt Weill (originally for A-cappella choir)
Lyrics: Bertolt Brecht
Piano: Jori Schulze-Reimpell
Arrangement: Jori Schulze-Reimpell and Linda Babiak

The text of the “Legend of the Dead Soldier” was written by Bertolt Brecht in 1917 or 1918 (Brecht gave different information on this) and was first published under the title “The Ballad of the Dead Soldier” in the appendix of the drama “Drums in the Night” in 1922. In 1927, Brecht then included the legend in his “Hauspostille.” In addition to the scoring by Weill (originally for an a cappella workers’ choir), there are also scorings by Hanns Eisler and Ernst Busch. The text was intended from the get-go as a vocal performance, since Brecht himself performed it in the manner of a Moritat singer. Allegedly, after the Hitler putsch in November 1923, the piece was number 5 on the putschists’ blacklist and was cited as one of the reasons for Brecht’s expatriation on June 8, 1935.

Caro nome (Giuseppe Verdi)

Gilda’s aria “Caro nome” (Sweet Name) from Verdi’s opera “Rigoletto”. Sung at a recital of the Robert Schumann Conservatory in Düsseldorf.

Mit Dir möcht’ ich am Sonntag angeln gehn (Walter Kollo)

A snippet from the Tonjuwelen. Walter Kollo’s “Mit Dir möcht’ ich am Sonntag angeln gehn” during a recital of the Robert Schumann Conservatory in Düsseldorf.

Die Männer sind schon die Liebe wert (Adolf Steimerl)

A snippet from the Tonjuwelen. Adolf Steimerl’s “Die Männer sind schon die Liebe wert” during a recital of the Robert Schumann Conservatory in Düsseldorf.